Sunday, August 7, 2016

Church Lady Apron


Aprons have been around for a very long time.  When people started wearing clothes, they started wearing aprons.  Aprons protect everyday clothing from the slop and mess of life.  While aprons have been used in different industries and for different purposes throughout history, the apron has been and is a major player in the production and consumption of food.   Everyone in the food industry wears an apron, from the people in the processing plant to the servers at the restaurant.  Aprons aren't only for protection however, throughout history, aprons were also worn as outfit embellishments.  Nearly every traditional women's costume includes an apron.  Today, aprons are still worn for protection, but we also like them to be a little stylish; to make a statement; to add interest to our daily work.  

One of my favorite aprons is the Church Lady Apron, created by Mary Mulari.  Find the pattern HERE.  There are 2  reasons I love this apron.  First,  It is simple, but stunning and second, it versatile.  It is reversible so you have two aprons in one.  You can cook with one side and serve with the other (not messy) side.

I used fabrics from the Dreamin' Vintage collection by Jeni Baker for Art Gallery Fabrics.  I LOVE Jeni Baker's fabrics.


I am all about simplicity, so I have added a couple of design changes to this apron pattern that I want to share with you.  I only put one pocket on each side of the apron so I don't have the headache of trying to make the two pockets on one side even and not lopsided.  I use the pocket pattern that is included, but my pocket pattern has has a little trim at the top.  To make this pocket, you first, cut your pocket pattern out and then cut a strip of fabric that is longer than the pocket and 2-3 inches wide.

Sew the trim to the top of the pocket

 Lay the pocket lining on top of the pocket fabric so all of the sides and bottom match.

Pin the other side of the pocket trim to the pocket lining.

 It will look like this when pinned.
Match your pocket with the lining and finger press the top of the trim.  Pin and sew.  Turn the pocket right side out and press.  Top stitch the top of the pocket.  The rest of the pocket will be top stitched when you put it on the apron.


The next design change is in the neck strap. Sew your apron neck straps to the apron body.  Then, when you are sewing the apron together, leave the neck straps open.  This is in addition to the opening you will have to turn the apron right-side out after you've sewn the apron together.
 
Next, sew the neck strap together on one side and leave it open on the other side.
Third, press your seams so they match, top and bottom.  Press one side of the top neck piece under and lay it down on top the  then lay the unsewn piece on top of the sewn piece.
When you top-stitch your apron, start with the neck seam.  Top stitch the open seam down and then continue around the body of the apron with your top stitch.




Find these lovely Jeni Baker fabrics HERE


Linking to:  Around Tuit, Inspire Me Monday, Monday Making, Em's Scrapbag, Craftsy Monday, Merry Monday Link Party Project Inspired Linky Party, Show and Tell, Too Cute, Midweek Makers, Handmade Hangout, Needle and Thread Thursday, Can I Get A Whoop Whoop, Fabric Frenzy Friday, Saturday Sparks, Show Off Saturday,  A Bouquet of Talent, That DIY Party 

32 comments:

  1. This made me chuckle -- I really could have used a Church Lady apron YESTERDAY! I was all dressed for church, making myself a latte before I headed out the door for choir warmup and ended up splashing coffee grounds onto my skirt! Your aprons look adorable, and the bright prints remind me of aprons that my grandmother used to wear. :-)

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    1. I'm sorry Rebecca;-) Thank you for visiting my blog and sharing your story.

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  2. Thanks for the ideas to make these aprons. Now, do I want to buy the pattern and make a few? I wear aprons a lot because, let's face it, I am a messy cook! Thanks.

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  3. If you do make a few you'll love them I bet.

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  4. I like the colors of the aprons -- so fresh and fun! You make the pattern look easy and simple. Thanks! --Wendy at piecefulthoughts@gmail.com

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    1. This is pretty easy. It's fun to make.

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  5. What pretty aprons! Thanks for sharing :]

    Blessings,
    Edye | Http://gracefulcoffee.wordpress.com

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  6. Thanks for the link to the free pattern as these are great aprons! And you made them with such fun fabrics too! Thanks for sharing on Midweek Makers
    Susan

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  7. What a neat idea! I don't wear an apron much but find I need one when I stir fry. I have two old waist style aprons--I wear one around my waist and one around my neck. It works but looks ridiculous. This pattern sure would solve my problem, wouldn't it?

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  8. Cute aprons. Thanks for sharing how you did the pockets.

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  9. Your aprons are great. I never think to wear an apron.

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    1. They do seem to save the cloths...in my kitchen anyway.;-)

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  10. I too enjoy making aprons and have sewn a lot of them. I will have to check out this pattern since I've never seen it before. I do like your pattern changes.

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    1. You should give this a try. It's easy and fun.

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  11. Love this apron. I wear them all the time...so I'll be sure to keep this on my to-do sewing list! You won the little giveaway on my blog. Please email me your address and I'll send it along. ;)

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    1. Aren't aprons handy and they're not just for cooking anymore. Thank you!!!! for picking me to receive your sweet gift!

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  12. Your aprons are adorable! Love the fabric you picked. xoxo

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    1. Thank you! I love Jeni Baker's fabrics.

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  13. Such a cute apron - and the reversible feature is priceless! Whoop whoop!!

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  14. If I cooked, I'd be making one of these, Kathi. Lucky for me, hubby does the cooking. Maybe I should make him one, but I know he'd never remember to put it on.

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    1. I am a minimalist cook too. Thank goodness my husband likes to cook and isn't picky about what I make.

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  15. I've featured your fab aprons today, Kathi.

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