Thursday, June 19, 2014

Sash As You Go


I am making some headway with the UFO's I happened on a week or so ago.  I think I had planned to make a baby quilt with these blocks, but after laying the blocks out, I decided it would be too large for a baby quilt.  Actually, there were enough blocks to make two baby quilts.  This blog is dedicated to how I sashed these sweet blocks.  But before I begin talking about sashing this quilt, I am going to talk a little bit about self sashing.  Self sashing is not a real quilting term, I just made it up.  It's what I call it when you add sashing as part of your quilt block.  When I made my Tulip Quilt Pattern, I self sashed it.

The directions for the quilt give you a block that looks like this.  The sashing is included in the pattern of the quilt block.  You can see it here on the right side and the top.



When the sashing is part of the block, you don't have to sew all of those pesky sashing strips.  You only sew two sashing strips, one for the left side and one for the bottom.  

So, that is self sashing and sash as you go is quite similar.  Sash as you go is another one of my made-up terms.  Since my blocks were already made, I couldn't sew the sashing as I made the block.  Instead, I sewed the sashing to each block and then sewed the blocks together.

I sewed a 2-1/2" strip to the bottom of every block.
Then I sewed a 2-1/2" square to the end of my remaining 2-1/2" strips.  I sewed these strips to the left side of each block.  I had 24 blocks that looked like this.
When you sew the blocks together, they are sashed!

When you have finished sewing your top, you just have to piece two strips, one for the top and one for the side to finish your sashing.
And, you know, if you add a strip of sashing to the un-sashed side of each set of blocks before you sew the strips of blocks together, you only have to make one sashing strip for the top.











15 comments:

  1. I use this method of adding sashing too. it saves so much time! And I hate sewing long skinny strips :).

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  2. I hate lots of long skinny strips too! Thank you for stopping by.

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  3. It's a great idea that works really well. I've used it in the past, but not with the cornerstone blocks. Yours looks very effective - have to give that a go.

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    1. I am always looking for the easiest way to do things. Thank you for stopping by.

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  4. I totally agree! There are times when I go ahead and sash with continuous long strips, but I like doing it this way for sure!

    Thank you so much for linking up to Needle and Thread Thursday!

    :) Kelly @ My Quilt Infatuation

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    1. Thank you for hosting Needle and Thread Thursday. I get lost in the posts for hours.

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  5. You make some beautiful blocks.

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  6. I LOVE 30s fabrics and they are so delightful in this beautiful little quilt!

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  7. Beautiful blocks and quilt tops. I also do my sashing this way. Less room for error! And fewer small pieces!

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    1. Aren't they easier to put together;)

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  8. Oooh, love the tip on sashing as you go. It's looking great!

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  9. Good Morning Kathi, I think I must be the only person who does not know about this sashing technique..... I love it and it certainly makes life a lot easier. I am making a baby quilt at the moment and I will certainly be using your technique.
    It is lovely to meet you and I have enjoyed my visit so much that I have become a new follower with Google +. I look forward to catching up on some of your other posts.
    Best Wishes to you.
    Daphne

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